Working with Startups what do Law Firms and Attorneys contribute?

While it sounds tautological, the most important thing a law firm brings to the startup table is…a knowledge of the law surrounding everything having to do with founding, financing and operating a startup!

But while obvious, that doesn’t make it any less important. There are an enormous number of laws that cover the world of business, and those go up almost exponentially once you start dealing with fundraising/financing. Many times I have seen startups skimp on legal expenses in the early days, only to learn the very costly lesson that a lot of work had to be done over again, and in some cases even jeopardized the company’s very existence. The peace of mind that comes from knowing that a firm like WSGR or White & Williams has your back is extraordinarily liberating. Trust me. Read more

What measures do VC’s take to mitigate conflicts of interest between investments?

The best way for a VC to mitigate conflicts between portfolio companies is to avoid investing in direct competitors in the first place! While this can be a bit difficult for seed funds with very large portfolios and limited direct day-to-day involvement, most larger funds are careful to avoid directly competitive investments. The reason for this is simple: why have part of your investment in one company be used for the sole purpose of fighting against part of your investment in another one? Read more

One Of These Days, You May Not Be An Entrepreneur

Image via Wikipedia

Image via Wikipedia

If I had a dollar for every time someone has said to me, “One of these days, I’m going to start my own company,” I’d be rich. If this day ever comes for all these people, we will be overrun by startups. Yet I don’t lose any sleep over either of these possibilities.

Most people procrastinate from time to time, but I suspect that the challenge here is somewhat deeper than that. So I did my own informal survey of business books, to gather the key reasons why most people never start the journey. If you recognize yourself in any of these categories, you may be more of a “wanna be” than a real entrepreneur: Read more

What is the average startup rating on gust.com?

The rating system provided by Gust on the investor side is not intended to be used as any type of objective or standardized measurement. That’s because it was designed to be completely customizable for each angel group or venture fund using the platform.

Group administrators have the ability to turn ratings on or off, show or hide them, establish the scale for them, and decide on how many criteria a profile is rated.  As such, it is an extremely flexible system that can be used in many different ways, so an “average” would be like averaging apples and truffles. Read more

What are the biggest global events for Venture Capitalists and Business Angels where they can learn about their own business?

There are surprisingly few such conferences, for the very good reason that there are actually relatively few such people (venture capitalists and ‘professional’ angel investors) to attend them! But that said, here are the biggest (i.e., “only” :-) events of their type):

Business Angels
Angel Capital Association (US) Annual Summit
This is the big one, which rotates among different cities in the US each year. Leaders and active members of all the major North American angel groups attend this three day conference, along with a large delegation of international business angels. Sessions are all about how to improve angel investing and manage angel groups, as well as connecting with other industry players and getting technical presentations. The first day is full of optional educational seminars from The Power of Angel Investing series, developed by the Angel Resource Institute. Read more

The Raise: Fundraising Tips from Investors and Entrepreneurs

The Raise: Fundraising Tips from Investors and Entrepreneurs
The 85-Percent
Thursday, February 27, 2014 from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EST)
New York, NY

Navigating the fundraising process can often seem daunting, like you’re trying to make your way through a labyrinth of investors, lawyers, and business advisors. Join Women In Music and The 85-Percent on February 27th for an in-depth discussion on how to start the fundraising process and navigate the world of startup investing. Ilana Grossman, Gust’s VP of Marketing, will reveal expert fundraising tips alongside a panel of investors and successful entrepreneurs. You’ll learn the nuts and bolts of obtaining startup funding, including:

  • Timing your raise
  • Designing an outreach plan to potential investors
  • Qualities investors look for in startups
  • Creating and delivering your pitch
  • Overcoming hurdles when raising capital
  • What happens after the investment


Reserve your seat now. 

How To Decide If A Celebrity Can Help Your Venture

Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield via Wikipedia

Justin Timberlake and Andrew Garfield via Wikipedia

Most startups dream of attracting a celebrity endorsement, and assume that it will take their startup to the stars. Startups such as Chirpify have managed to flourish and raise millions with endorsements from folks like Lil Wayne and Snoop Lion. Others go the way of 12Society, an LA subscription commerce startup with six celebrity sponsors, but still couldn’t get any traction.

Startups using celebrities is such a hot topic these days that Gary Vaynerchuck, noted author and entrepreneur, has coined a new term “star-ups” for the phenomenon. New books are popping up on the subject of how and when to seek celebrity endorsements, including “Will Work for Shoes,” a popular one by Susan J. Ashbrook, who has courted celebrities for twenty years. Read more

Martin Zwilling , Founder and CEO, Startup Professionals
February 23rd, 2014