How often do investors take a meeting with companies that they have rejected when the company was in its early stages?

It happens, but it’s not typical, given their limited time and the large number of companies they need to process in order to find the “keepers”.

Things that increase their likelihood of being open to another meeting after having previously passed on an investment:

  • A case where the entrepreneur was specifically asked to “come back after they have more traction.”
  • A major, public, positive event affecting the company
  • A significant change in stage, if that was one of the stated reasons for passing (such as “we only invest in post-revenue companies”)
  • A direct re-recommendation from a highly trusted source who is aware of the earlier pass and recommends a re-look
  • A case where the investor loved the entrepreneur but was skeptical about the business, and something has now seriously changed or been de-risked.

*original post can be found on Quora @ http://www.quora.com/David-S-Rose/answers *

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Virtual Team meeting image via Wikimedia blog

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Image via Wikipedia

Image via Wikipedia

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